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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)
economy back to work and create jobs, jobs, jobs. that's what this is about. our deficit has been coming down and the patient approach is to recognize that we actually have time. we should bring the deficit down, but we have time. we should take the cuts off the table and think about how to get the economy going. if people work again, we are on the road to solving the problem. >> to that point and looking at the cuts you have been pointing out to head start and cuts to wic, the women, infant and children nutritional assistant program, they are penny wise and foolish and may be making things worse in the long run. >> i'm glad you raised that, crystal. if you think about the single mom working 12 hours a day and her paycheck does not take her to the end of the month on food. what she realizes and has been a responsible mom, but realizes after she makes the decision to have her child not have an abortion is that her paycheck is not going to help her feed her infant. the women infant children program not only feeds these families, it also teaches them about nutrition and how to be healther a
off and watch the deficit go down by what they built into this system, what was intended to be the ultimate stick because they had not been able to resolve longer term solutions to the budget, so these sweeping cuts would help to kind of reset the order and put the country on a path to saving some money. you have republicans now, and fiscal conservatives, particularly, who say that if the sequester does happen, it will be a way to force the country into recognizing the need for further cuts. as some of the measures go into effect, that would create another time of urgency to get to the table and talk about this. the president and senate democrats will talk about additional tax revenue which they thought was settled as a way to put this forward. what is happening where senate democrats are having a retreat, meeting behind closed doors, looking at how long could they delay the sequester, how much time could they buy themselves, and how would they pay pour it? would there be cuts elsewhere or new revenue, some kinds of new tacks? they're trying to resolve that. the president
coming into the u.s. and more made in america products shipped overseas, the u.s. trade deficit fell sharply last month. the combination now has economists believing the economy grew in the last few months of 2012, even though data out last week showed the economy fell slightly in the fourth quarter. but a closer look shows some cause for caution. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the december trade numbers were much better than forecasters expected. the deficit between what the u.s. exports and what we import fell 21% to $38.5 billion. and that means exports likely boosted growth in the last three months of 2012. >> so this is a good sign that exports were a little stronger than we thought when the numbers were first estimated and that is obviously a good sign for the economy. again, the economy is obviously growing way too slowly, but at least on this note, i think it will be revised upward. energy is a now a bright spot for the u.s. economy. thanks to new fracking technology, surging domestic production cut crude oil imports last year by 227 million barrels. but that success was
are in for a massive and unsustainable increasing deficit if we don't get a handle on entitlements. good morning. glad to have you with us. gregg: the cbo is saying it deficit will go down to $840 billion. that's the first time it will drop a trillion dollars under president obama. martha: but with baby boomers retiring at the rate of 10,000 people a day. entitlement spending is set to explode. stuart, as we pointed out, there is a lot of enthusiasm that we won't rack up a trillion dollar deficit. >> reporter: the headline was all about the deficit is going to be below a trillion dollars. that's great news. the bad news and there is a lot of it. the next 10 years medicare will cost $1 trillion a year. obama-care subsidies will total nearly a trillion dollars. the cost of medicaid will double and the debt will go to the highest portion of tour economy than it's been in a generation. there is dismal views on the current state of the economy. 1.4% growth this year and the unemployment rate will rise at 8% and stay that way for years to come. martha: the cbo makes very clear we need to do some entitlement
the budget deficit will drop below $1 trillion for the first time during obama's presidency. the congressional budget office which assumes that federal spending cuts will go into effect march 1st says the government will run a deficit of $845 billion this year compared to last year's $1.1 trillion shortfall. but the cbo's ten-year outlook predicts those improvements will not last. it warns that an aging population will drive up entitlement spending and rising interest rates will put the debt at unsustainable levels. if current laws remain in place, debt by 2023 only ten years from now will equal 77% of gdp. that's roughly double the 39% average seen over the past 40 years. >>> and president obama is asking lawmakers to take quick action as a march 1st deadline approaches that will trigger deep spending cuts. "the new york times" writes this morning that "mr. obama, who missed a deadline this week to submit his annual budget to congress, acknowledged on tuesday that a broader deficit agreement is unlikely to be reached by the march deadline. he provided no details about the t
the deficit and avoid spending cuts. we're learning the budget deficit will top $845 billion this fiscal year even with massive tax hikes and assuming the spending cuts do kick in. congressman tom price pushing the president to balance the budget and says this new report is proof we can't do that by hiking taxes. what about that? we're still going to be deep into the red. >> good to be with you. the president has put forward for different budgets, none of which have ever come to balance. the house republicans have acted responsibly, our budget is yet to balance, so what we will do is put together a budget that balances in a ten-year time. all it does tomorrow it says to the president tell us when you'ryourbudget balances. it is important to do that because we have our principled solutions with the program. liz: used a dozen state when the budget would be balanced, is that it? >> we have had to end dollars deficit of the past four years in the past for budgets by this president have never come into balance ever in the 75 year time frame we talk about budgets. the american people need to know t
the deficit but americans do not support sacrificing real spending cuts for more tax hikes." >>> efforts by the white house to head off spending cuts come as a new government report predicts the budget deficit will drop below $1 trillion for the first time during obama's presidency. the congressional budget office which assumes that the cuts will go into effect march 1st says the government will run a deficit of $845 billion this year. that's compared to $1.1 trillion short fall. the outlook predicts the improvements will not last. it warns that an aging population will drive up retirement spending and rising interest rates will put the debt at unsustainable level it's current laws remain in place, debt by 2023 will equal 77% of gross domestic product. that is roughly double the 39% average seen over the past 40 years. >>> coming off the republicans' bruising defeat, eric cantor is looking to rebrand his party n a speech at a d.c. think tank, he moved away from his combative tone expressing a need to work on issues with president obama important to the nation. >> hour house majority will
about deficits, we are buying in to the right wing mantra somehow deficits are killing the economy. look at great britain and doing with their austerity plans and doesn't add up. i'm much more of the mind to be proactively looking at infrastructure investment like many of the business advisers told president obama should happen. people from commerce, from industry. i get it. that won't happen as long as house republicans are dead set against it. and what we're left with is unfortunately in my view a detente to put the discussion in the frame the republicans want. what about deficits? we have a jobs crisis in this country. not a deficit crisis. to me, the whole conversation has been pushed to the right further than it should be. >> and karen, on a last note, in anticipation of the president's speech, the white house released numbers on the people affected by the cuts. i believe around 600,000, between 600,000 and 800,000 suffering as a result of cuts to food stamps and other program that is people need to survive these days and at least some of the analysis out there, democrats feel that
with smarter spending reductions to bring down the deficit. we can do it in a gradual way so that there is less of an impact. these deductions that certain folks can take advantage of, the average person cannot. not everyone has access to cayman island accounts, the average person does not have access to carry interest income, where they wind up paying a much lower rate on the billions that they earned. we want to make sure that the whole system is fair and transparent and that we are reducing our deficit in a way that does not hamper growth and reduce the kinds of strategies that we need in order to make sure that we are creating a strong middle-class. host: jim from south carolina, on the republican line, good morning. caller: how are you? host: well, thank you. caller: you keep mentioning and hearing people talking about pensions, but pensions are just invested the same way that 401k is. stocks and bonds. people with pensions lost money as well. i heard cases where people were not going to get as much money. if someone is manages their 401k, i do not know, it needs to be managed properly and
street journal," chief economic correspondent. welcome. you wrote a piece saying how the trust deficit is hurting the economy. what we're trying to do? >> guest: we usually talk about things but budget deficits and trade deficits with things we can measure. what i'm talking about is the breakdown of trust in american society. it would take her in institutions that make our economy go. when you look at measures of trust from surveys by gallup for the pew institute that americans have, it's a very important institution including the media newspaper, television, congress, banks, large corporations, public school, public union. if all been going down for many years and allowed them, declining interest intensified leading up to and going into the financial crisis and there's a lot of reasons for the things we can talk about. but what were chained to get out of the story is this matters economy but trust breaks down. a nobel prize-winning economist named kenneth arrow for 40 years ago set every commercial transaction hasn't been a bad element of trust when you trust your counterparty come ne
the economy is in a recession or if it it's sagging, then you need deficit spending to get it moving. republicans used to agree with that. even in 2007 and 2008, they were proposing different stimulus measures. they no longer agree with the idea that they get the economy moving in a rough time. so maybe you have to actually have some spending cuts go into effect and see the effect on the economy for them to recognize the fact that oh, yes, if we take this money out of the economy, the economy will go down. that's what happened last quarter. if you hit the pentagon and if you hit domestic spending there's no question that the economy will retreat. so maybe they actually have to see that happen and then there will be some type of political reckoning and a turnaround and we can talk rationally about how to get this economy going again and create jobs. >> of course the president insisted -- and he talked about this yesterday -- he thinks we have to stop lurching from crisis to crisis. >> we continue to have these self-inflicted crisis here in washington that suddenly leads everybody to t
's a good idea. but my whole philosophy is i don't think the deficit is our top issue. i think if you're really concerned about the deficit we should have gone over the fiscal cliff and cut the deficit that way. but if you aren't concerned about the deficit, if you think job growth is the most important thing and growth in general, then i don't think you should either cut taxes -- i don't think you should raise taxes or cut spending right now. i think you should focus just on stimulus. >> what they should do is slash across the board all these goofy departments, just really rip into them. and along with that pro-growth tax reform. especially pro-growth business tax reform. and then you'll have the kind of growth that keith is talking about that would actually solve the financial position. >> keith wants growth in general. i don't want growth in general. i want private sector growth. i don't want a bunch of phony government spending that's going to proup gdp numbers. i want private sector growth. if the president wants to make a deal where we get rid of some of these short-term spendin
the deficit automatically picks up because there's slow revenue coming in and there's the need to spend on programs to help ease us through a slow period. it was wise policy, wise policy. >> bob, what do you think? >> well, i agree with laura that a better policy would be to put these cuts into entitlement reform and have them occur over time rather than immediately and abruptly, but it doesn't seem like the other side it s willing to engage in discussion of entitlement reform right now, so maybe we need to go ahead and do what we have to do and then keep the negotiations open. >> is that the issue then, laura? since we can't come to a deal when the republicans feel like they have leverage, they have got to do it when they can do it? >> i honestly don't think so. we have elections coming up in two years. i've heard republican members of the hill saying that this is what the public wants, the public wants a sequester. the public doesn't want a sequester. when the public realizes what a sequester means for jobs in their community, for education programs in their community, for the fact th
, he talked about the economy. when it comes to tackling the nation's deficit, president obama said sunday in an interview with cbs news there needs to be revenue involved. and it sounds like he might be interested in going after people like mitt romney. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way so that it doesn't have a huge impact. and as i said, when you look at some of these deductions that certain folks are able to take advantage of, the average person can't take advantage of them. the average person doesn't have access to cayman island accounts. the average person doesn't have access to carried interest income where they end up paying a much lower rate on billions of dollars that they've earned. so we just want to make sure that the whole system is fair. >> all right. steve, help me out here. i think the democrats are holding a losing hand if they come back and ask for more taxes. they talk about raising tax rates on anybody. but if we're talking about closing loo
like the deficit in the ryan budget was we will save unbelievable amounts of money by turning medicaid over to the states and somehow they will figure it out. >> that's more information than other people are putting out. >> talk about missing deadlines, now this is a really low bar. >> what is the democratic plan in the senate, let's say, or in the white house, to save medicar medicare? >> medicare actually - actually -- interesting you focus on that. medicare has been a pretty good story the past few years. my view is double down on things happening. medicare grew only by 3% last fiscal year, unbelievable low by standards. >> will you take that gamble >> for the next five years, i will take a 50/50 bet medicare will continue to grow at much slower rates than historically. >> down to 2 1/2, 3% the next couple years. >> that will tick up a little bit as the economy picks back up but i don't think we'll see the 10% growth rate. >> so you don't think medicare is a problem? >> it is a problem but this is one area better than official projections. >> what about medicaid. >> medicaid. big pr
're brewed by starbucks. coming up next, how can washington solve the deficit and spur growth? "new york times" washington bureau chief david leonhard may have the answers, and he joins us live next. this happy couple used capital one venture miles for their "destination wedding." double miles you can "actually" use. but with those single mile travel cards... [ bridesmaid ] blacked out... but i'm a bridesmaid. oh! "x" marks the spot she'll never sit. but i bought a dress! a toast... ...to the capital one venture card. fly any airline, any flight, anytime. double miles you can actually use. what a coincidence? what's in your wallet? [ all screaming ] watch the elbows ladies. a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ if you don't have something important to say? [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could
out of washington to get our deficits under control. hopefully, we do not have to many quarters where we end up in negative territory. this is not an economy growing six percent and can hinder those bibles easily. host: magnolia, texas, david, better. caller: [indiscernible]we are doing great here. i noticed the super bowl is forming dollars per minute. everything is packed. all of the football stadiums. i do not see any recession. host: you said you are doing better why? caller: i live 15 miles from where they are building the number one country in the world. we are getting roads. it is unbelievable around here. we have job signs everywhere. as far as the savings, when interest rates are 1.5%, who will put their money in the bank? bernanke wants you to put it in stocks. that is why there is no interest rate. i took my money for years ago when i bought those rifles. i have made so much money on them. it is unbelievable. host: he mentioned social security. there is a category about the social safety net. guest: we use the term government social benefits to cover quite a few different p
families. and that means a balanced package that will reduce our long-term deficit and debt, but that still allows us to invest in those things that we need to grow right now because that's also a deficit reduction agenda that's growing faster. and in order to have a balanced package that means that we've already done a lot of cuts. we've done some revenue now, and so the rest of the way moving forward we can do some additional reforms and make our health care programs work better and make them more efficient, and we can cut out programs that we don't need, but it also means that we've got to be able to close some tax loopholes and deductions that the average american cannot take advantage of, to raise the revenue, to actually do the job in a way that allows us to continue to grow. now, the reason this is relevant is because i gather and i haven't gotten this from first-hand sources, but from second hand sources in the press that our friends on the other side of the aisle, their position is we're concerned about the sequester. we recognize that just cutting the federal spending with the mea
an economic value of negative $16.3 billion. that is basically a deficit in its capital reserve because of mortgages continuing to go bad. but one fha critic, ed pinto, of the american enterprise institute testified today by his analysis the fha is actually short by more than $50 billion. so critics say that this means the fha is headed for a bailout but, fha supporters say that the critics are hyperventilating. >> if the fha were a private financialness stigs likely somebody would be fired, somebody would be fined or the institution would find itself in receivership. instead it is merely merrily on its way to becoming the recipient of the next great taxpayer bailout. >> i don't think there are many independent people think we're looking at the next great bailout. yes, the fha is little bit of an issue at the moment because of its countercyclical mission, by the way it was part of a their original mission to come in during the difficult times. they did that and they are in trouble because of it. >> reporter: house republicans got legislation through congress last year to try to reform t
and the deficit and debt crisis, everyone is entrenched in their positions and sitting back and saying, i think sequestration is going to happen. you know who is going to take the brunt of it. the across the board nature of the cuts are going to hurt our ability to train and maintain, vehicles, ships and airplanes and the things that provide the readiness for our military are going to take a dramatic cut and we'll have done nothing to reform the way we spend money and put our country on a sound physical track. >> of course, pete, as we talk about cutting back, our enemies are ramping up and you see north korea doing more testing and iran moving possibly closer to nuclear weapons. do our enemies overseas pay attention to our budget woes and our plans here at home? >> sure they do. they look at our capabilities. they look at our disposition. they perceive us differently when we're perceived to be drawing back and pulling away from the world and cutting our capability. so, what happens in washington is watched very, very closely and that's why we have to demonstrate our commitment to maintaining t
this about reducing the deficit. >> there is no dow that we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. we can do it in a gradual way so it does not have a huge impact. the average person cannot take advantage of them. they do not have access to cayman islands account. the average person does not have access to carried interest income. melissa: i do not know, how do you interpret that. that sounds like the tax man is coming. lori: we have been talking about eliminating loopholes and tax deductions for a while. melissa: we have not done it. lori: right. but it is not a new proposal to the people. melissa: he tries to hide behind the wealthy people. it is coming for everybody. anyway, fighting back. we will introduce you to a man training the troops fighting the cyber war. lori: what happened last night. the super bowl in the dark for 33 minutes. we will shed some light on the situation. ♪ i'm a conservative investor. but that doesn't mean i don't want to make money. i love making money. i try to be smart with my investments. i als
this week. the ongoing debate over the rising debt and deficit and how to rein in government spending. here is a portion of the address. [video clip] >> i recently voted to present the democratic majority in the u.s. senate with a simple but powerful challenge. pass a budget, or you do not get paid. by forcing senate democrats to finally live up to one of the most basic responsibilities of governing, we are presenting them with a golden opportunity to confront and fall -- solve our spending program. we are holding president obama accountable for the sequestered cuts he first proposed in 2011. republicans want to replace the sequester, which is a series of harmful across the board cuts with better, common-sense cuts and reforms. all of this will require democrats to finally get serious about the spending problem. each of the last two years, the republican-led house has passed a responsible budget that addresses what is driving the debt to put our country on a path to prosperity. unfortunately, it has been for years some senate democrats last pass the budget. 1000, 375 days to be exact. -- 16
2014 but, this is a big but, a lower deficit, the smallest since president obama's been in office, well under $1 trillion. they attribute that to an improving economy and to the fiscal cliff deal. veronica. >> tracie potts, thank you. >>> a major decision expected from the boy scouts of america. national board members set to vote on whether to lift the decade long ban on guy leaders and scouts. it comes after a meeting at the texas headquarters. it is a controversial issue from both sides and putting one of the largest youth organizations under a microscope. scouting should be open to everyone. texas governor rick perry expressed the opposite opinion. board members choose to scrap the policy, local scout units will be able to decide for themselves on whether or not to admit gays to the rankings. >>> on the heels of the boy scouts decision, the pentagon is announcing a policy shift for guy service members and partners. leon panetta expected to extend benefits to partners of personnel. it remains doubtful that medical, down theal and housing allowances are offered under the new proposal.
to deficit reduction. the chairman of the president's council of economic advisers said, quote, today's report is a reminder of the importance of the need for congress to act to avoid self-inflicted wounds to the economy. on the plus side there was a jump in hiring despite the uncertainty washington faced as it flirted with going over the fiscal cliff at the end of the year. jon. jon: wendell goler at the white house krupb -fg some number crunching some numbers for us, thank you. jenna: for more of a look at the 7.9 unemployment rate we'll take a look a little bit of how the numbers really affect the average american. right now the labor department says there are nearly 12.5 million unemployed americans in this country. that doesn't include the so-called marginally attached. there's nearly 2.5 million people who are unemployed who have stopped looking for a new job, that is the number that represents them, or the 8 million people who are forced to work part time because they simply can't find full time work. overall the jobless problem is expecting close to 23 million people, and that
in order to bring down our deficit. if you combine those things together we cannot only reduce our deficit but we can invest in education and research and development that will help us grow. martha: what do you think about that at home and what does karl rove think about that. former senior adviser to president george w. bush. there was a lot in that sound bite. we know the tax hikes have kicked in, but the president is suggesting that we need more money from the american people essentially. >> we have a spending problem not a revenue problem. revenues this year are anticipated to be above the year they were in fiscal '08. they are going to be over $2.9 trillion over $2 trillion. spending has increased more rapidly than revenues. the tax revenues we got as a result of raising the rates on the top two brackets was eaten up about it congress in one spending bill proposed about it administration, the sandy relief measure. we have a spending problem and it's going to get worse. martha: during the campaign we heard from governor romney about changing the structure of the tax code long term inst
're going to be serious about reducing our deficit, can we combine some smart spending cuts because there's still some waste in government. can we reform our health care programs in particular because we spend a lot more on health care than every other country does, and we don't get better outcomes. there's a lot of waste in the system. there are things we can do to reduce health care costs. and can we close some loopholes and deductions that folks who are well connected and have a lot of accountants and lawyers can take advantage of. they end up paying lower rates than a bus driver or a cop. can we close some of those loopholes? if you combine those things together, then we can not only reduce our deficit, but we can continue to invest in things like education and research and development that are going to help us grow. washington cannot continually operate under a cloud of crisis. that freezes up consumers. it gets businesses worried. we can't afford these self-inflicted wounds. there is a way for us to solve these budget problems in a responsible way through a
economy we have will be beneficial because people are worried about the deficit, worried about the death that comes from the growing deficit so taking a stab at that for the first time in a long time will be beneficial to the economy. connell: are we making progress yet or is there much, much more to do? it is not just economists on the left making this argument, listen, to an half trillion being cut, we are getting there. smell is not the time to get all ciccone in. what do you say of those people? >> in 2007 we were spending 19.7% of gdp in the federal government. it is now around 23 or so. we want to get it back to where it was, so it is not austerity, it is not ciccone and, it is going back to a sensible level of spending. dagen: is a real problem the federal reserve, zero interest rate policy, buying treasury debt and mortgage securities, said the reason congress gets to get away with what it has been doing? >> it makes a little bit easier with the low rates and zero rates, so it is counterproductive but i think the main thing is people have to understand we had a spending explosion
to lower these deficits. connell: that means the problem is not, as you say, tomorrow's problem. what is a reasonable timetable for when the deficit and the debts are a big, big problem? >> i think in my view, it is as far as the eye can see. we are always thinking about a ten year horizon. we need to broaden not out even further. when you do that, the problem becomes a lot more acute. with a debt to gdp ratio, it is not so serious compared to other countries such as japan. it just is not as dire as the headlines suggest. connell: when do we deal with it? is there something to this argument to spend more money so we can create jobs? what is the timetable for when we actually should deal with it? >> i think that if you ask me do we have to do with the problem and the next three months or the next 30 seconds, the answer is no. the economy is growing below 2%. in that kind of an environment, you have to continue to be supportive. when you look at the payroll tax, that takes a considerable chunk off. you have to sequester that will take off an equal amount. we have to be careful not to ov
. total tax revenues last year were 2.5 trillion. and so if you talk about trillion dollar deficits, it's not terribly difficult to look forward and doing something to really be talking about 2 trillion. >> 2030 or 2025 and it just keepts getting worst. >> it gets worse. there are 10,000 people a day turning 65 for the next 19 years. and this is the baby boom. >> this is what you do, too. as an insurance company it's all about actual aerial assumptions. so you actually know this. i think people will look at you and get glazed that's not for sure that that's going to happen. as an insurance company you need to know and you are sure. >> the demographics are clear between 2000 and 2010, so history, the age group of 55 to 64 grew by 75%. >> wow. >> that's the group that's going to move into the entitlement arena. so i'd like to think about it differently than most. rather than debating it as a taxing problem or spending problem, it's a demographic challenge that we've never faced before. we've never faced what's going to come at us -- >> and it's combined with all the expensive medicine we'
budget. bring down the deficits in a balanced, responsible way. >> is washington the biggest problem for the economy? >> i think clearly it is a major headwind. it spends a lot of money ineffectively. you can say that whether you're a conservative or a liberal. a source of job loss. in spite of conservative harping of government occupying too much, there's 1.5 million job shed from state and local government. a lot of those are teachers, first responders. and the inability of the government to put capital in motion and $3 trillion plus in spending in any way effectively is not doing any of us any particular good. the only happening decent right now in terms of growth tends to be what's going on ex-government and that doesn't mean that government couldn't do a lot better but washington isn't. >> let's talk about what's happening on wall street as the banner says, main street versus wall street or main street and wall street depending on your perspective. sometimes it does feel like it's a us against them scenario but the dow now over 14,000 mark. still with the millions of people look
. let's reform the defense budget and look at the largest drivers of our deficit in mandate spending programs those on the left end of the spectrum don't want to cut. >>brian: they took gates cuts and are going try to up them by $500 billion. leon panetta takes over from them. has the same fear. here's what he said yesterday on "meet the press." >> we've got a plan for that possibility because there are so many members saying we're going to let it take place, but i have to tell you it is irresponsible for it to happen. i mean, why -- why in god's name would members of congress elected by the american people take a step that would badly damage our national defense, but more importantly undermine the support for our men and women in uniform? why would you do that? >>brian: that is inaccurate. it is the president who proposed these sequester cuts. this isn't congress doing that. and republican fear about these cuts, would you say that's accurate? >> i would say it's accurate. there is a growing resignation to them on the hill for some reason. i was there two weeks ago. everyone seems re
of that cycle? with some of the problems that we're facing right now with the deficit issues, with the entitlement issues that are coming up, how do we get politicians to start talking about some of those tough realities? >> i don't know. the ones that do get slaughtered. i don't know how we do it. i wish i were that smart. >> do you think it's holding back business at this point? or does business operate kind of outside the sphere of what's happening in washington. >> oh, you can't operate outside the sphere. the last few years, where anybody in a corporation was considered evil, and i really felt that way. i know my colleagues felt that way, you have to operate in spite of washington. and because, first of all, you have a responsibility, shareholders employees customers, whatever, but you're a business. and you're there to run a business, and to make good products and get profit, and la, la, la, everybody's happy. so you have to do it even with the weight of washington strapped to your back every day. >> you said that you felt the last two years that businesses and your col
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)

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